Tag Archives: Screening and Prevention

A preliminary procedure, such as a test or examination, to detect the most characteristic sign or signs of a disorder that may require further investigation, and the steps you can take to avoid unpleasant medical consequences.

CDI Miami | Tuesday March 27, 2018

What is a PET Scan?

A Positron Emission Tomography (“PET”) scan is an imaging test that allows your doctor to check for diseases in your body.

The scan uses a special dye that has radioactive tracers. These tracers are injected into a vein in your arm. Your organs and tissues then absorb the tracer when highlighted under a PET scan. The tracers help your doctor see how well your organs and tissues are working. The PET scan can measure blood flow, oxygen use, glucose metabolism (how your body uses sugar), and much more.

 

Why a PET Scan Is Performed
Your doctor may order a PET scan to inspect the blood flow, oxygen intake and metabolism of organs and tissues, they are commonly used to uncover:

  • -Cancer
  • -Heart problems
  • -Brain disorders
  • -Central nervous system disorders

PET scans give doctors glimpses of complex systemic diseases, as they show disorders at the cellular level. Here are a few examples:

  • -seizures
  • -tumors
  • -coronary artery disease
  • -brain tumors

Risks of a PET Scan
The PET scan involves radioactive tracers, however, the exposure to radiation is minimal. According to the Mayo Clinic, radiation levels are too low to affect normal processes in your body. The risks of the test are minimal compared with the benefits the results from diagnosing serious medical conditions.
However, radiation exposure is unsafe for developing fetuses. If you’re pregnant or breast-feeding, do not get a PET scan.

How a PET Scan Is Performed

Before the scan, you’ll get tracers through a vein in your arm, a solution you drink, or in a gas. Your body needs time to absorb the tracers, so you’ll wait about an hour before the scan begins.

Next, you’ll undergo the scan. This involves lying on a narrow table attached to a PET machine, which looks like a giant letter “O”. The table glides slowly into the machine so that the scan can be conducted.

During the scan, lie still. The technician will let you know when it is that you need to remain still. You may be asked to hold your breath for short periods. You’ll hear various buzzing and clicking noises during the test.

When all the necessary images have been recorded, you will slide out of the machine.

After the PET Scan

After the test, you can go about your day unless your doctor gives you other instructions. Drink plenty of fluids after the test to help flush the tracers out of your system. Generally, all tracers leave your body after a few days.

 

CDI Miami | Thursday March 1, 2018

The Importance of Mammograms

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime. One of the most effective ways to find and/or prevent breast cancer is through regular mammography screenings.

A mammogram is a specific type of breast exam that uses a non-invasive X-ray process that doctors use to identify and treat any abnormal areas that may possibly indicate the presence of cancer. Annual mammograms can detect cancer up to two years before a patient or physician will notice any abnormalities. Mammograms can also prevent the need for extensive treatment for advanced cancers and improve chances of breast conservation.

The Miami Center for Diagnostic Imaging now uses an even quicker and more accurate version of digital mammography. 3D mammography, also called breast tomosynthesis, is a revolutionary technology that gives radiologists the ability to identify and characterize individual breast structures without the confusion of overlapping tissue. During a tomosynthesis scan, multiple, low-dose images of the breast are acquired at different angles. These images are then used to produce a series of one-millimeter thick slices that can be viewed as a three dimensional reconstruction of the breast.

Mammograms play an important role in women’s health. They have been shown to lower the risk of dying by 35% in women over the age of 50. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death among women; it is estimated that over 220,000 women in the United States will be diagnosed; and an estimated 2,150 men will also be diagnosed. More than 80% of breast cancers are found in women with no family history.

In addition to mammograms, women, starting at the age of 20, should make sure to schedule regular clinical exams with a health care provider; and should also perform regular self-examinations. Women at average risk for developing breast cancer should discuss with their health care provider the potential benefits of a screening breast MRI in addition to their yearly mammogram.

The digital mammography experts at the Center for Diagnostic Imaging and Comprehensive Breast Care Centers provide women with the most advanced care available to help keep them healthy.

 

About Center for Diagnostic Imaging:

The Center for Diagnostic Imaging Miami staff is dedicated to providing the highest level of efficient and excellent care for each patient who walks through their door. The center, known for their reputation as one of the best full body scan Miami facilities in the state, is owned and managed by physicians, radiologists, technicians, and other highly trained and qualified staff. The staff-ran facility’s mission is to serve the healthcare needs of the Miami community with the use of the most highly advanced technology medical equipment within the diagnostic imaging industry.
With this type of technology available at their fingertips, staff members have the ability to better identify any issues or concerns impacting the health and well-being of each individual patient.

The Center for Diagnostic Imaging currently offers the following scanning services:

  • Computer tomography Scan (CAT Scan)
  • Computed Tomography Angiography Scan (CTA Scan)
  • Magnetic Resonance Angiography scan (MRA)
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
  • Nuclear Medicine
  • Position Emission Tomography Scan (PET Scan)
  • X-Rays

In addition to their diagnostic services, the center is also known as one of the most preferred breast ultrasound Miami facilities. When it comes to breast exams women the can receive 3D Mammography scans, MRI guided biopsies, and stereotactic biopsies.

CDI Miami | Wednesday August 2, 2017

How Dense Breasts Can Impact Breast Cancer Screening

and How 3D Mammography Offers Improved Accuracy

In some of our recent blogs, we have discussed how 3D mammography can be more accurate in detecting breast cancer in women with dense breasts. But, what exactly does it mean to have dense breasts?

dense breast

A doctor examines a digital mammogram of a dense breast and points to a potential cancer
Source: National Cancer Institute

Breast density refers to the ratio of fatty tissue to breast tissue – dense breasts have more breast tissue and less fatty tissue. Usually, the younger a woman is, the denser her breasts are, and the more difficult it is to “see” through the tissue on a mammogram to identify cancer. In fact, this is why mammograms are generally not done until a woman is 40, unless there is a history of breast cancer in her family. However, age is not the only factor. Some women can have naturally dense breasts their entire lives. About 1/3 of women over the age of 50 still have dense breasts. Continue reading

CDI Miami | Wednesday March 29, 2017

Mammography Trends to Watch This Year

mammogram miami

 

A new year brings much in tow – new ideas to share, new trends to address, new technologies to install. While it is difficult to say exactly what will affect us the most as we begin 2017, there are certain trends that seem to leap out ahead of others. Here are five trends we expect to have a vital impact on medical imaging in 2017:

1. 3D mammography. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been a frequent topic in trade publications for a few years. As more studies are released touting the success of this technology in finding lesions and reducing recall rates, its popularity is only going to increase. Especially as media has been touting the benefits of this technology in recent years.

2. Multimedia enhanced radiology reporting (MERR). Text-only reports are fading away. A study from Emory University and the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute found that 80% of respondents said MERRs “improved understanding of radiology findings by correlating images to text reports.” The study also found that the multimedia reports provided easier access to images while monitoring the progression of a condition, and saved time understanding findings without supporting images. While improving the radiology report, the multimedia-enhanced version also provides more financial value to radiologists.

3. Radiology goes to the cloud. Radiology is quickly migrating to the cloud. According to an article in Applied Radiology, the global cloud computing market in healthcare was valued at $1.8 billion in 2011, and is expected to grow at 21% at compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of 21% to $6.8 billion by 2018. While initial upfront costs can vary between the intensity of building an organization’s own private cloud, or the ease and flexibility of using public cloud architecture, the process efficiency, financial predictability of paying for only what the organization needs and long-term cost savings are making the cloud a worthwhile investment.

4. Telemedicine. The global telemedicine market was $27 billion, and the market has already surged past that number for 2017. By 2018, two-thirds of interactions with healthcare organizations will be conducted via mobile devices. Last year was an important year for telemedicine, as wearable technology become prominent. Telemedicine is expected to be valued around $3.8 billion by 2019, according to Transparency Market Research. Expect telemedicine to bring together health facilities like never before – from large systems to those located in rural areas.

5. Centralization of clinical data. Collaboration is a must for health facilities. No department can be left out of the patient experience equation now.

CDI Miami | Monday March 13, 2017

What are the different types of breast cancer?

Although many of us think of breast cancer as a single disease, the diagnosis is not limited to one type. Most breast cancers start as small tumors. Some stay put; others travel. How the tumor behaves and how it grows will dictate how it’s classified and your treatment options.

The Cancer Treatment Centers of America website broadly organizes breast cancers into two groups based on how the cancer behaves: noninvasive (in situ) breast cancer and invasive (infiltrating) breast cancer.

Noninvasive Breast Cancers

In noninvasive breast cancer, “cancerous cells remain in a particular location of the breast, without spreading to surrounding tissue, lobules or ducts,” the website reports. Noninvasive breast cancers are generally earlier stage cancers that respond well to treatment. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ, or DCIS, is the most common form of noninvasive breast cancer; the American Cancer Society reports that 60,000 cases of DCIS, or about 20 percent of all breast cancer cases, are diagnosed in the United States each year.

DCIS begins inside the milk ducts – ‘in situ’ means that it stays within the duct and is considered noninvasive because it hasn’t spread to other surrounding tissues. Dr. Harold Burstein, institute physician at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School says it’s a “precancerous lesion, often diagnosed in women who’ve had mammograms, and it’s sort of a precursor to breast cancer.” Similar to a colon polyp. “It’s a benign growth, but you remove it to remove the growth” and prevent the development of invasive cancer.

Even with surgery to remove the growth, patients with SCIS are at higher risk of reoccurrence and later development of invasive cancer, but breastcancer.org reports the rate of reoccurrence is less than 30 percent.

Invasive Breast Cancers

In invasive breast cancers “cancerous cells break through normal breast tissues barriers and spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream and lymph nodes,” reports Breastcancer.org. According to the American Cancer Society, invasive ductal carcinoma, or IDC, is the most common form of breast cancer – about 80 percent of cancer diagnoses are ISC and about 180,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the U.S.

As with DCIS, IDC also begins inside the milk ducts, but these growths have moved beyond those boundaries and have begun invading or infiltrating the tissues around the ducts. Unlike noninvasive lesions, these growths are cancerous tumors, and treatment will likely be more aggressive than with a SCIS diagnosis. If left untreated, IDC usually spreads to the lymph nodes and then onwards to other parts of the body.

Get your yearly 3d mammogram and breast cancer screening at CBCC! Early detection is the best way to fight breast cancer. Call 800-371-0002 to schedule your appointment. The Center for Diagnostic Imaging in Miami also offers advanced MRIs, CT Scans, and more.

types of breast cancer miami

CDI Miami | Wednesday February 22, 2017

MRIs can determine which babies will develop autism as toddlers

The first-of-its-kind study used MRIs to image the brains of infants, and then researchers used brain measurements and a computer algorithm to accurately predict autism before symptoms set in.

Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in infants with older siblings with autism, researchers from around the country were able to correctly predict 80 percent of those infants who would later meet criteria for autism at two years of age.

“Our study shows that early brain development biomarkers could be very useful in identifying babies at the highest risk for autism before behavioral symptoms emerge,” said senior author Joseph Piven, MD, the Thomas E. Castelloe Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. “Typically, the earliest an autism diagnosis can be made is between ages two and three. But for babies with older autistic siblings, our imaging approach may help predict during the first year of life which babies are most likely to receive an autism diagnosis at 24 months.”

People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (or ASD) have characteristic social deficits and demonstrate a range of ritualistic, repetitive and stereotyped behaviors.

Using MRIs to screen infants gives parents powerful resources to address, if not prevent disorders. By taking MRIs of brain volume, surface area, cortical thickness at 6 and 12 months of age, and sex of the infants, in conjunction with a computer program; can help potentially identify infants who will later develop autism, before the symptoms of autism begin to consolidate into a diagnosis.

According to Dr. Piven, “Putting this into the larger context of neuroscience research and treatment, there is currently a big push within the field of neurodegenerative diseases to be able to detect the biomarkers of these conditions before patients are diagnosed, at a time when preventive efforts are possible,” Piven said. “In Parkinson’s for instance, we know that once a person is diagnosed, they’ve already lost a substantial portion of the dopamine receptors in their brain, making treatment less effective.”

CDI Miami | Thursday February 16, 2017

Breast Cancer: The Importance of Early Detection and Screening

Women in the United States have a 1 in 8 chance of getting breast cancer.  The good news is that

when breast cancer is detected early, it can be cured.  Studies show that the five-year survival rate for localized breast cancer is 97 percent, while the 12-year survival rate is 95 percent for cancers that are detected while still smaller than 1 centimeter in size.  The size of the cancer and how much it has spread are two of the most important factors contributing to the success of treatment.

 

The key to successful treatment is early detection and screening.  Screening exams are designed to find breast cancer while it is still small and localized – before it causes symptoms like an obvious lump.  Breast cancers detected after symptoms arise are usually bigger and are more likely to have spread to areas beyond the breast.  Early detection saves thousands of lives each year, so it’s important for women of all ages to know what tests are available and when to get them.

Breast Cancer Action Early Detection Saves Lives Logo

logo credit: Breast Cancer Action

Women Ages 50+

Women in their 50s are at the greatest risk of contracting breast cancer. What are some ways to prevent it? Watch your weight! Women who gain weight (20 pounds or more ) after menopause are significantly more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than women who maintain a healthy weight.

Maintain at least a yearly mammogram to monitor any possible breast cancer developments.
Women Ages 40 – 49

 

Women 40 and older should have a mammogram each year, as long as they are healthy and free from serious health problems like congestive heart failure, end-stage renal disease, dementia, etc.

 

Various types of mammograms are available today, including 2D film or digital mammograms and 3D mammograms.  Regardless of type, a mammogram is safe and is considered to be the best available test for detecting and diagnosing breast cancer.

 

Film, digital and 3D mammograms all use compression and a series of X-rays to generate pictures of internal breast tissue.  During the exam, the technician compresses the breast with a paddle and takes images from various angles to obtain the necessary pictures.

 

If a patient receives abnormal mammogram results, doctors often order a breast ultrasound or an MRI breast scan as a follow-up test.  These tests can zero in on a specific area identified by the mammogram, and they can help shed more light on whether the area in question might be a cyst or solid mass.  A breast ultrasound or MRI breast scan can also sometimes distinguish between benign and cancerous tumors and can help doctors determine whether steps such as a stereotactic breast biopsy are necessary.

 

Women in 20s and 30s

 

Younger women – those in their 20s and 30s – should have clinical breast exams every three years.  A CBE is usually done in conjunction with a mammogram and is an opportunity for women to discuss any changes in breast tissue, options for medical imaging scans, and any hereditary factors that could increase breast cancer risk.

 

A breast self-exam is another option for women starting in their 20s, and is something that can be done on a monthly basis throughout life.  While self-exams play a smaller part in detecting breast cancer compared to other methods, they nonetheless help women become familiar with how their breasts normally look and feel.  This makes it more likely that a woman will notice if a change occurs – perhaps a lump, swelling, pain, discharge, etc.  Many times these symptoms are not cancerous, but they should always be reported to a doctor so the appropriate follow up tests can be done.

 

For a woman in her 20s, the odds of contracting breast cancer are quite low; however, the risk does increase with age.  CBEs and self-exams enable women to know what is normal for them so they can immediately report any changes to their doctors.

 

High-Risk Women

 

Today, doctors use various risk assessment tools – such as the Gail model, the Claus model, and the Tyrer-Cuzick model – to help determine a woman’s risk for breast cancer.  These tools give approximations of risk based on various factors and data.  Genetic testing is also available and can identify whether a woman carries the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation.

 

For women who are identified as high-risk patients, experts recommend a yearly mammogram and MRI breast scan.  An MRI breast scan is used in addition to a mammogram, rather than in place of it.  While an MRI is more sensitive than a mammogram, it does miss some cancers that a mammogram can otherwise detect.

 

In most of these high-risk cases, the combination of mammograms and MRI breast scans should start at age 30 and continue as long as a woman is healthy enough to receive the tests.  However, the age to start the exams should take personal situations and needs into account and can be modified accordingly by the doctor and patient.

 

Women having any of the medical imaging scans mentioned above should do so at a certified diagnostic imaging center to ensure they receive the most accurate tests possible.  The Center for Diagnostic Imaging is proud to offer Comprehensive Breast Care Centers in the Miami area that offer all women access to life-saving mammograms, breast ultrasounds and MRI breast scans.

CDI Miami | Friday December 30, 2016

Mammograms Are for Every Age

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Women who think they are too old to worry about mammograms may want to reconsider the age at which their breast cancer screening years are behind them, a new study suggests.
Based on an analysis of nearly 7 million mammograms over a seven-year period, “the benefit continues with increasing age up until 90,” said study author Dr. Cindy Lee. She is an assistant professor in residence at the University of California, San Francisco.

The question of when to stop having mammograms has been widely debated. In 2009, the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force issued new guidelines, saying there wasn’t enough evidence to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening mammography in women aged 75 and older.

According to the study, investigators looked to see whether the mammography screening correlated in higher cancer detection rate and a lower recall rate.

In the analysis, which included data from 39 states from 2008 through 2014, nearly four breast cancers were found for every 1,000 patients screened. The recall rate was 10 percent.

“We are finding more cancers with increasing age,” Lee said, which makes sense because the risk rises with age. “We are doing better at catching them,” she said. And, “we have decreased the recall rate. We are calling back fewer women for additional testing, but are finding more cancers.”

The study findings suggest that the decision to screen may depend on a woman’s personal choice and health status. The study was to be presented at the Radiolofical Society of North America annual meeting, in Chicago. Studies presented at medical meetings are viewed as preliminary until they are published in a peer-reviewed journal.

According to Robert Smith, vice president of screening for the American Cancer Society, said the study finding show that mammograms are still worthwhile after the age of 70.

“Many of these deaths are avoidable, as Lee and colleagues demonstrate in this new report, since mammography screening performs increasingly well as women get older. While incidence is high, the disease is slower growing and density is lower, providing improved opportunity for early detection,” Smith explained.
The Comprehensive Breast Care Centers in South Florida offer mammograms and 3D mammograms which help detect breast cancer early. Contact us today to schedule your Breast Cancer Screening and mammogram.

CDI Miami | Tuesday October 4, 2016

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

This month, we remind our patients to take steps to have a plan to detect breast cancer in its early stages and to encourage the women in your life to do the same. This plan can be as simple as performing regular breast self-exams and scheduling your clinical breast exams and mammograms based on your age and health history.

 

The American Cancer Society recommends that women without breast symptoms who are 40 and older should have a mammogram every year. Beyond mammograms, our CDI centers in South Miami and Aventura offer advanced Breast MRIs. MRI excels at imaging soft tissue and is therefore recommended for women with higher risk levels for breast cancer.

 

Is a Breast MRI Right for Me?

Use these guidelines developed by the American Cancer Society to help determine if you should talk to your doctor about a Breast MRI exam.

 

Recommended Annual Screening Indications

  • BRCA1 – Women with this gene mutation have a 60-80% chance of developing breast cancer over a lifetime.
  • BRCA2 – Women with this gene mutation have a 40-80% chance of developing ovarian cancer over a lifetime.
  • Women with a first-degree relative who is a CRCA carrier, but who is untested.
  • Women with a lifetime risk of breast cancer of 20-25% or greater.
  • Women who have had radiation to the chest area between the ages of 10-30 (usually for Hodgkin’s Disease).

Diagnostic Indications

  • Evaluation of suspicious clinical or imaging findings that remain indeterminate after a mammogram, ultrasound and physical exam
  • Finding the extent of infiltrating ductal carcinoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma
  • Contralateral breast examinations in patients with breast malignancy
  • Evaluation before, during and after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy
  • Evaluation pre- or post-lumpectomy
  • Suspected tumor recurrence in patients with or without post-operative tissue reconstruction
  • Checking for breast malignancy with primary tumor unknown (MRI can usually see the exact location of a mass to save the breast)
  • Checking for leakage in silicone augmentation (verify insurance coverage prior to exam)

 

If you need a Breast MRI or 3D mammogram, take advantage of our Comprehensive Breast Care Center (“CBCC”) for the best treatment options in South Florida. We specialize in early detection of breast cancer, provided by a fully trained staff and team of Board Certified Radiologists. With locations in North Miami Beach, South Dade, and Aventura, CBCC has South Florida covered when it comes to advanced breast cancer screenings. Call us at 1.800.371.0002 to schedule your appointment today.

CDI Miami | Friday September 9, 2016

CT scan vs MRI

A CT Scan (or CAT Scan) is best suited for viewing bone injuries, diagnosing lung and chest problems, and detecting cancers. An MRI is suited for examining soft tissues in ligament and tendon injuries, spinal cord injuries, brain tumors, etc. CT scans are implemented in emergency rooms and the scan can take fewer than 5 minutes. An MRI, on the other hand, can take up to 30 minutes.

Advantages of MRI over CT Scan
 A CAT scan uses X rays to build up a picture. An MRI uses a magnetic field to do the same and has no known side effects related to radiation exposure.

 MRI gives higher detail in soft tissues

 Another advantage of MRI is the ability to change the imaging plane without moving the patient.

Advantages of CT Scan over MRI

 CT is best for imaging bone structures

 An MRI is contraindicated for patients with surgical clips, metallic fragments, cardiac monitors or pacemakers cannot receive an MRI.

 Treatment time is shorter than an MRI

 MRI cannot be done on claustrophobic patients as the patient has to remain inside a noisy machine for up to 45 minutes

 CT scans are less expensive than an MRI. A CT scan costs $1,200 to $3,200; while an MRI can cost upwards of $4,000.
Machine Cost

These machines can cost from several hundred thousand to millions of dollars – which explains why treatments are so expensive. A basic CT scan can cost between $ 85,000 to $150,000. A 16-slice scanner costs $145,000 to $225,000 and the top-of-the-line 64-slice CTs can cost up to $450,000. The machines may typically need annual maintenance, which can cost tens of thousands of dollars.

For more information about diagnostic imaging services in South Florida, contact us here. Call us Toll Free at 800-371-0002.