Tag Archives: MRI

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a technique that uses a magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed images of the organs and tissues within your body.

CDI Miami | Thursday May 9, 2019

Things You Ought To Know About Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Things You Ought To Know About Magnetic Resonance Imaging

MRI or Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a widely used scanning method for viewing every organ and body structure. It is developed primarily to be used in medicine for every defect in the soft tissues. MRI Miami beach is one of the greatest advancements in the diagnostic medical techniques that have revoluntised the entire medical science over the past century.

What is MRI?

MRI is a diagnostic imaging procedure done using magnetic and radio waves to create detailed images of the body’s structures (including soft tissues),  which is impossible to do with the use of X-rays or other forms of radiation. A typical MRI Scan takes something between 30 minutes and one hour.

In an MRI scan, the patient is positioned in a large MRI chamber on a sliding imaging table.

Process

In the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), the nuclear magnetic alignments of different atoms are exploited inside a magnetic field to generate detailed images.

MRI centers in Miami have various MRI machines whose main components are the large magnets that are used to generate magnetic fields around the body part or target of analysis. The magnetic fields affect the paramagnetic atoms such as hydrogen, gadolinium, and manganese to line up them in a magnetic dipole along every magnetic field, formed by the radiofrequency (RF) coils inside the Magnetic Resonance Imaging machine.

The machine captures accurately the relaxation of the atoms when they return to normal alignment. The RF pulse is temporarily ceased after this. The data which is collected after is used to generate an image on the basis of the resonance characteristics of the different tissue types.

Conversion

The computer transforms these signals into cross-sectional images giving detailed information (“slices”) of each part of the body which is scanned and reconstructed based on all the images into a single three-dimensional image for getting a clear image. MRI is used for various diagnostic purposes and to rule out certain diseases from the roots.

MRI is used for finding the determining the exact problem is inside the body and find its proper location. It is frequently used for detecting cancers that are difficult to diagnose. It is used to point out the precise location and size of tumors and for studying brain & spinal cord abnormalities.

MRI Miami is used to produce detailed images of the heart, major blood vessels that depict blood flow, joints, and soft tissues. It is used to find the lung disorders, digestive disorders, infections, and inflammatory conditions, disorders of urinary tract and kidneys and many more disorders of the body.

CDI Miami | Monday October 8, 2018

Role of Open MRI Miami Services in adequate Diagnosis of Diseases

Open MRI

An Open MRI Miami scan is an imaging scan procedure that helps in deep analysis of an ailment by capturing high-quality images of the organs. Your physician may recommend this test when they are unclear regarding any ailment that may require precise diagnosis so that the correct diagnosis of the ailment can be started.

It has been seen that most of the patients usually ignore the importance of a prominent imaging scan service provider and choose any of the available service providers in their area. Well, it is necessarily important for you to rely on an expert radiologist that can offer you the best in class services with proper assurance of quality reports. It would be a nice decision to consult your physician before picking any of the service providers so that you can get the assurance of quality reports. Here are some aspects that depict the role of MRI centers in Miami.

Better Services to Meet Diverse patient Needs

Some of the MRI procedures require special services and the entire scan is performed under controlled environment under the supervision of an expert. It is thus recommended that you should always emphasize finding the right service provider that can offer you these services without any hassle.

It would be a great decision to rely on the professionals as recommended by your physician so as to get the assurance of quality services. Moreover, it would be nice if you check the reviews and ratings of the radiologist on the internet to get an idea about their proficiency and reliability. Apart from this, one can always visit the official website of these service providers to check whether they are offering a special kind of service or not.

Timely Delivery of Reports to augment the treatment

It is necessarily important for you to emphasize the overall service of a radiologist that can help in the timely treatment of your ailment. Many patients are unaware of the fact that a little delay or a technical glitch in the delivery of accurate reports can adversely affect their overall treatment. Many physicians recommend south Florida diagnostic imaging service provider that can offer them the quality services.

You can expect accurate and timely reports from these reputed radiologists and can get the assurance of timely treatment of your diseases.

These aspects clearly depict the important role of reputed MRI service provider.

CDI Miami | Wednesday March 29, 2017

Mammography Trends to Watch This Year

mammogram miami

 

A new year brings much in tow – new ideas to share, new trends to address, new technologies to install. While it is difficult to say exactly what will affect us the most as we begin 2017, there are certain trends that seem to leap out ahead of others. Here are five trends we expect to have a vital impact on medical imaging in 2017:

1. 3D mammography. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been a frequent topic in trade publications for a few years. As more studies are released touting the success of this technology in finding lesions and reducing recall rates, its popularity is only going to increase. Especially as media has been touting the benefits of this technology in recent years.

2. Multimedia enhanced radiology reporting (MERR). Text-only reports are fading away. A study from Emory University and the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute found that 80% of respondents said MERRs “improved understanding of radiology findings by correlating images to text reports.” The study also found that the multimedia reports provided easier access to images while monitoring the progression of a condition, and saved time understanding findings without supporting images. While improving the radiology report, the multimedia-enhanced version also provides more financial value to radiologists.

3. Radiology goes to the cloud. Radiology is quickly migrating to the cloud. According to an article in Applied Radiology, the global cloud computing market in healthcare was valued at $1.8 billion in 2011, and is expected to grow at 21% at compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of 21% to $6.8 billion by 2018. While initial upfront costs can vary between the intensity of building an organization’s own private cloud, or the ease and flexibility of using public cloud architecture, the process efficiency, financial predictability of paying for only what the organization needs and long-term cost savings are making the cloud a worthwhile investment.

4. Telemedicine. The global telemedicine market was $27 billion, and the market has already surged past that number for 2017. By 2018, two-thirds of interactions with healthcare organizations will be conducted via mobile devices. Last year was an important year for telemedicine, as wearable technology become prominent. Telemedicine is expected to be valued around $3.8 billion by 2019, according to Transparency Market Research. Expect telemedicine to bring together health facilities like never before – from large systems to those located in rural areas.

5. Centralization of clinical data. Collaboration is a must for health facilities. No department can be left out of the patient experience equation now.

CDI Miami | Wednesday February 22, 2017

MRIs can determine which babies will develop autism as toddlers

The first-of-its-kind study used MRIs to image the brains of infants, and then researchers used brain measurements and a computer algorithm to accurately predict autism before symptoms set in.

Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in infants with older siblings with autism, researchers from around the country were able to correctly predict 80 percent of those infants who would later meet criteria for autism at two years of age.

“Our study shows that early brain development biomarkers could be very useful in identifying babies at the highest risk for autism before behavioral symptoms emerge,” said senior author Joseph Piven, MD, the Thomas E. Castelloe Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. “Typically, the earliest an autism diagnosis can be made is between ages two and three. But for babies with older autistic siblings, our imaging approach may help predict during the first year of life which babies are most likely to receive an autism diagnosis at 24 months.”

People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (or ASD) have characteristic social deficits and demonstrate a range of ritualistic, repetitive and stereotyped behaviors.

Using MRIs to screen infants gives parents powerful resources to address, if not prevent disorders. By taking MRIs of brain volume, surface area, cortical thickness at 6 and 12 months of age, and sex of the infants, in conjunction with a computer program; can help potentially identify infants who will later develop autism, before the symptoms of autism begin to consolidate into a diagnosis.

According to Dr. Piven, “Putting this into the larger context of neuroscience research and treatment, there is currently a big push within the field of neurodegenerative diseases to be able to detect the biomarkers of these conditions before patients are diagnosed, at a time when preventive efforts are possible,” Piven said. “In Parkinson’s for instance, we know that once a person is diagnosed, they’ve already lost a substantial portion of the dopamine receptors in their brain, making treatment less effective.”

CDI Miami | Thursday February 16, 2017

Breast Cancer: The Importance of Early Detection and Screening

Women in the United States have a 1 in 8 chance of getting breast cancer.  The good news is that

when breast cancer is detected early, it can be cured.  Studies show that the five-year survival rate for localized breast cancer is 97 percent, while the 12-year survival rate is 95 percent for cancers that are detected while still smaller than 1 centimeter in size.  The size of the cancer and how much it has spread are two of the most important factors contributing to the success of treatment.

 

The key to successful treatment is early detection and screening.  Screening exams are designed to find breast cancer while it is still small and localized – before it causes symptoms like an obvious lump.  Breast cancers detected after symptoms arise are usually bigger and are more likely to have spread to areas beyond the breast.  Early detection saves thousands of lives each year, so it’s important for women of all ages to know what tests are available and when to get them.

Breast Cancer Action Early Detection Saves Lives Logo

logo credit: Breast Cancer Action

Women Ages 50+

Women in their 50s are at the greatest risk of contracting breast cancer. What are some ways to prevent it? Watch your weight! Women who gain weight (20 pounds or more ) after menopause are significantly more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than women who maintain a healthy weight.

Maintain at least a yearly mammogram to monitor any possible breast cancer developments.
Women Ages 40 – 49

 

Women 40 and older should have a mammogram each year, as long as they are healthy and free from serious health problems like congestive heart failure, end-stage renal disease, dementia, etc.

 

Various types of mammograms are available today, including 2D film or digital mammograms and 3D mammograms.  Regardless of type, a mammogram is safe and is considered to be the best available test for detecting and diagnosing breast cancer.

 

Film, digital and 3D mammograms all use compression and a series of X-rays to generate pictures of internal breast tissue.  During the exam, the technician compresses the breast with a paddle and takes images from various angles to obtain the necessary pictures.

 

If a patient receives abnormal mammogram results, doctors often order a breast ultrasound or an MRI breast scan as a follow-up test.  These tests can zero in on a specific area identified by the mammogram, and they can help shed more light on whether the area in question might be a cyst or solid mass.  A breast ultrasound or MRI breast scan can also sometimes distinguish between benign and cancerous tumors and can help doctors determine whether steps such as a stereotactic breast biopsy are necessary.

 

Women in 20s and 30s

 

Younger women – those in their 20s and 30s – should have clinical breast exams every three years.  A CBE is usually done in conjunction with a mammogram and is an opportunity for women to discuss any changes in breast tissue, options for medical imaging scans, and any hereditary factors that could increase breast cancer risk.

 

A breast self-exam is another option for women starting in their 20s, and is something that can be done on a monthly basis throughout life.  While self-exams play a smaller part in detecting breast cancer compared to other methods, they nonetheless help women become familiar with how their breasts normally look and feel.  This makes it more likely that a woman will notice if a change occurs – perhaps a lump, swelling, pain, discharge, etc.  Many times these symptoms are not cancerous, but they should always be reported to a doctor so the appropriate follow up tests can be done.

 

For a woman in her 20s, the odds of contracting breast cancer are quite low; however, the risk does increase with age.  CBEs and self-exams enable women to know what is normal for them so they can immediately report any changes to their doctors.

 

High-Risk Women

 

Today, doctors use various risk assessment tools – such as the Gail model, the Claus model, and the Tyrer-Cuzick model – to help determine a woman’s risk for breast cancer.  These tools give approximations of risk based on various factors and data.  Genetic testing is also available and can identify whether a woman carries the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation.

 

For women who are identified as high-risk patients, experts recommend a yearly mammogram and MRI breast scan.  An MRI breast scan is used in addition to a mammogram, rather than in place of it.  While an MRI is more sensitive than a mammogram, it does miss some cancers that a mammogram can otherwise detect.

 

In most of these high-risk cases, the combination of mammograms and MRI breast scans should start at age 30 and continue as long as a woman is healthy enough to receive the tests.  However, the age to start the exams should take personal situations and needs into account and can be modified accordingly by the doctor and patient.

 

Women having any of the medical imaging scans mentioned above should do so at a certified diagnostic imaging center to ensure they receive the most accurate tests possible.  The Center for Diagnostic Imaging is proud to offer Comprehensive Breast Care Centers in the Miami area that offer all women access to life-saving mammograms, breast ultrasounds and MRI breast scans.

CDI Miami | Friday September 9, 2016

CT scan vs MRI

A CT Scan (or CAT Scan) is best suited for viewing bone injuries, diagnosing lung and chest problems, and detecting cancers. An MRI is suited for examining soft tissues in ligament and tendon injuries, spinal cord injuries, brain tumors, etc. CT scans are implemented in emergency rooms and the scan can take fewer than 5 minutes. An MRI, on the other hand, can take up to 30 minutes.

Advantages of MRI over CT Scan
 A CAT scan uses X rays to build up a picture. An MRI uses a magnetic field to do the same and has no known side effects related to radiation exposure.

 MRI gives higher detail in soft tissues

 Another advantage of MRI is the ability to change the imaging plane without moving the patient.

Advantages of CT Scan over MRI

 CT is best for imaging bone structures

 An MRI is contraindicated for patients with surgical clips, metallic fragments, cardiac monitors or pacemakers cannot receive an MRI.

 Treatment time is shorter than an MRI

 MRI cannot be done on claustrophobic patients as the patient has to remain inside a noisy machine for up to 45 minutes

 CT scans are less expensive than an MRI. A CT scan costs $1,200 to $3,200; while an MRI can cost upwards of $4,000.
Machine Cost

These machines can cost from several hundred thousand to millions of dollars – which explains why treatments are so expensive. A basic CT scan can cost between $ 85,000 to $150,000. A 16-slice scanner costs $145,000 to $225,000 and the top-of-the-line 64-slice CTs can cost up to $450,000. The machines may typically need annual maintenance, which can cost tens of thousands of dollars.

For more information about diagnostic imaging services in South Florida, contact us here. Call us Toll Free at 800-371-0002.

CDI Miami | Friday August 12, 2016

Do You Really Need That MRI?

Low back pain, headaches, heart palpitations; they could be minor, everyday health woes, or red flags that something serious is going on. Is it time to get an MRI?
With so many advances in medical technology at our fingertips in recent decades, doctors and patients have scurried to have images taken to rule out worst case scenarios.
The Choosing Wisely campaign was launched by the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation about three years ago, said Dr. Richard Baron, president and CEO of the foundation. The goal behind it, he said, is to help physicians and patients make more informed decisions about medical interventions, based on medical evidence. In other words, only get that MRI or EKG, or pop that pill, if research has actually proven it’s likely to help in a case like yours.
“The idea is there are things we know get done a lot, but the evidence suggests we probably shouldn’t be doing them as much as we are doing them,” Baron told CBS News.
When the campaign first launched, there was some resistance, “It was counterintuitive to some professional societies and they said that some of their members may not like this because it is how they make their living,” Baron said. But it ended up causing quite a buzz, he added.
In a system where health care providers are being paid on a fee-for-service basis, more medical tests are going to be done than are needed, said Baron. “Some have just gotten into the habit of doing it and they think more is always better. And many patients think this, too,” Baron said.

 

The following are overused tests that should prompt serious discussion between doctors and patients. They include:

  • MRIs for headaches and low back pain
  • CMR, an imaging test for chest pain and cardiac screening
  • Whole body scans to screen for cancer
  • Some repeat colonoscopies
  • Certain mammograms, such as before elective breast surgery or after breast reconstruction
  • CT scan and MRI screening tests for brain aneurysms
  • Blood tests for miscarriage risk and urinary tract infections in older people

For neurology, Callaghan said, “MRIs for headaches and low back pain are overused. It’s one of the most-duplicated tests.”

 

 

 

 

CDI Miami | Wednesday June 29, 2016

MRI Links Saturated Fats to Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

The presence of high saturated fatty acids in breast tissue may be a useful indicator of cancer in postmenopausal women, according to a new study by researchers at NYU Langone medical Center. The study was published online in Radiology, a journal of the Radiological Society of North America.

The researchers identified the relationship between fatty acids and breast cancer. Perhaps one day, these finding may lead to a greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms behind breast cancer development and the role of fat as a factor in breast cancer diagnosis and progression.

“Our study offers the first evidence — seen in breast tissue — that high saturated fatty acids in the breast adipose tissue is associated with presence of breast cancer in postmenopausal women,” said senior author and investigator Sungheon G. Kim, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Radiology at NYU Langone and a researcher at the Center for Advanced Imaging, Innovation and Research.

The relationship between body mass index (BMI), fat and cancer development has previously been studied, with postmenopausal women found to be at increased risk for breast cancer as their BMI increases. However, this study suggest the composition of the fat itself may play a role as well.

The relationship between body mass index (BMI), fat and cancer development has previously been studied, with postmenopausal women found to be at increased risk for breast cancer as their BMI increases. However, this study suggest the composition of the fat itself may play a role as well.

CDI Miami | Tuesday June 21, 2016

The ALARA Principal

Intrinsic to working in radiology is working with radioactive materials. Although we will always be exposed to some level of radiation, we use the ALARA principal (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) to keep exposure to a minimum.

 

This principle assumes that there is no threshold for inducing “biological effects” and therefore any dose of radiation carries with it some risk. In other words, there is no level of “safe” radiation.

 

Using the strategies of Time, Distance, and Shielding, we can keep radioactive exposure as low as reasonably achievable. This maximizes efficacy for your treatment and keeps everyone safe, especially our patients. Below is a list of techniques we use to minimize radiation exposure:

 

alara principle

    1. Safe delivery of radiopharmaceuticals – When the syringe is being held with the plunger or needle, we make sure that it is managed with the utmost precaution, and, we take advantage of remote injectors whenever possible.

 

  • Transportation of Patients – How close to the back of the wheelchair are we standing when transporting a patient? Do we maintain appropriate distance when we are walking them out of the department or when we enter the scan room?

 

 

  • Cleaning up spills (including patient blood or body fluids) – This relates to how quickly we isolate and remove fluids that could contaminate the scan room, or mitigate the effect of the treatment.

 

 

  • Holding / Lifting Patients – We pay particular attention to where we stand in relation to our patients, especially if we have our radiation badge on.

 

 

  • Radioactive Tracers – When using these in treatment, we make sure that the all the precautions are made, so that we can have a safe and efficient treatment.

 

 

  • During PET/CT/MRI Scans – We drape our patient’s bodies with a radioactive shield, isolating the exposure to only the areas that need treatment.

 

 

These techniques are just a tiny sample of the ways we consider your wellbeing during our examinations. For diagnostic imaging services, including PET/CT Scans, MRIs, and Mammograms contact the Center for Diagnostic Imaging in Miami.

 

 

CDI Miami | Tuesday May 17, 2016

How to survive an MRI or CAT scan if you’re claustrophobic

For some people, just thinking about an MRI is enough to provoke anxiety. For the approximately 9 percent of people diagnosed with claustrophobia, or a fear of enclosed spaces, “anxiety” is an understatement. Even for those without a clinical diagnosis, feelings of claustrophobia during an MRI are common.

However, there are many ways to overcome your fears before an MRI. Here are a few suggestions:

Continue reading