Tag Archives: Cancer

CDI Miami | Monday March 13, 2017

What are the different types of breast cancer?

Although many of us think of breast cancer as a single disease, the diagnosis is not limited to one type. Most breast cancers start as small tumors. Some stay put; others travel. How the tumor behaves and how it grows will dictate how it’s classified and your treatment options.

The Cancer Treatment Centers of America website broadly organizes breast cancers into two groups based on how the cancer behaves: noninvasive (in situ) breast cancer and invasive (infiltrating) breast cancer.

Noninvasive Breast Cancers

In noninvasive breast cancer, “cancerous cells remain in a particular location of the breast, without spreading to surrounding tissue, lobules or ducts,” the website reports. Noninvasive breast cancers are generally earlier stage cancers that respond well to treatment. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ, or DCIS, is the most common form of noninvasive breast cancer; the American Cancer Society reports that 60,000 cases of DCIS, or about 20 percent of all breast cancer cases, are diagnosed in the United States each year.

DCIS begins inside the milk ducts – ‘in situ’ means that it stays within the duct and is considered noninvasive because it hasn’t spread to other surrounding tissues. Dr. Harold Burstein, institute physician at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School says it’s a “precancerous lesion, often diagnosed in women who’ve had mammograms, and it’s sort of a precursor to breast cancer.” Similar to a colon polyp. “It’s a benign growth, but you remove it to remove the growth” and prevent the development of invasive cancer.

Even with surgery to remove the growth, patients with SCIS are at higher risk of reoccurrence and later development of invasive cancer, but breastcancer.org reports the rate of reoccurrence is less than 30 percent.

Invasive Breast Cancers

In invasive breast cancers “cancerous cells break through normal breast tissues barriers and spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream and lymph nodes,” reports Breastcancer.org. According to the American Cancer Society, invasive ductal carcinoma, or IDC, is the most common form of breast cancer – about 80 percent of cancer diagnoses are ISC and about 180,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the U.S.

As with DCIS, IDC also begins inside the milk ducts, but these growths have moved beyond those boundaries and have begun invading or infiltrating the tissues around the ducts. Unlike noninvasive lesions, these growths are cancerous tumors, and treatment will likely be more aggressive than with a SCIS diagnosis. If left untreated, IDC usually spreads to the lymph nodes and then onwards to other parts of the body.

Get your yearly 3d mammogram and breast cancer screening at CBCC! Early detection is the best way to fight breast cancer. Call 800-371-0002 to schedule your appointment. The Center for Diagnostic Imaging in Miami also offers advanced MRIs, CT Scans, and more.

types of breast cancer miami

CDI Miami | Thursday February 16, 2017

Breast Cancer: The Importance of Early Detection and Screening

Women in the United States have a 1 in 8 chance of getting breast cancer.  The good news is that

when breast cancer is detected early, it can be cured.  Studies show that the five-year survival rate for localized breast cancer is 97 percent, while the 12-year survival rate is 95 percent for cancers that are detected while still smaller than 1 centimeter in size.  The size of the cancer and how much it has spread are two of the most important factors contributing to the success of treatment.

 

The key to successful treatment is early detection and screening.  Screening exams are designed to find breast cancer while it is still small and localized – before it causes symptoms like an obvious lump.  Breast cancers detected after symptoms arise are usually bigger and are more likely to have spread to areas beyond the breast.  Early detection saves thousands of lives each year, so it’s important for women of all ages to know what tests are available and when to get them.

Breast Cancer Action Early Detection Saves Lives Logo

logo credit: Breast Cancer Action

Women Ages 50+

Women in their 50s are at the greatest risk of contracting breast cancer. What are some ways to prevent it? Watch your weight! Women who gain weight (20 pounds or more ) after menopause are significantly more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than women who maintain a healthy weight.

Maintain at least a yearly mammogram to monitor any possible breast cancer developments.
Women Ages 40 – 49

 

Women 40 and older should have a mammogram each year, as long as they are healthy and free from serious health problems like congestive heart failure, end-stage renal disease, dementia, etc.

 

Various types of mammograms are available today, including 2D film or digital mammograms and 3D mammograms.  Regardless of type, a mammogram is safe and is considered to be the best available test for detecting and diagnosing breast cancer.

 

Film, digital and 3D mammograms all use compression and a series of X-rays to generate pictures of internal breast tissue.  During the exam, the technician compresses the breast with a paddle and takes images from various angles to obtain the necessary pictures.

 

If a patient receives abnormal mammogram results, doctors often order a breast ultrasound or an MRI breast scan as a follow-up test.  These tests can zero in on a specific area identified by the mammogram, and they can help shed more light on whether the area in question might be a cyst or solid mass.  A breast ultrasound or MRI breast scan can also sometimes distinguish between benign and cancerous tumors and can help doctors determine whether steps such as a stereotactic breast biopsy are necessary.

 

Women in 20s and 30s

 

Younger women – those in their 20s and 30s – should have clinical breast exams every three years.  A CBE is usually done in conjunction with a mammogram and is an opportunity for women to discuss any changes in breast tissue, options for medical imaging scans, and any hereditary factors that could increase breast cancer risk.

 

A breast self-exam is another option for women starting in their 20s, and is something that can be done on a monthly basis throughout life.  While self-exams play a smaller part in detecting breast cancer compared to other methods, they nonetheless help women become familiar with how their breasts normally look and feel.  This makes it more likely that a woman will notice if a change occurs – perhaps a lump, swelling, pain, discharge, etc.  Many times these symptoms are not cancerous, but they should always be reported to a doctor so the appropriate follow up tests can be done.

 

For a woman in her 20s, the odds of contracting breast cancer are quite low; however, the risk does increase with age.  CBEs and self-exams enable women to know what is normal for them so they can immediately report any changes to their doctors.

 

High-Risk Women

 

Today, doctors use various risk assessment tools – such as the Gail model, the Claus model, and the Tyrer-Cuzick model – to help determine a woman’s risk for breast cancer.  These tools give approximations of risk based on various factors and data.  Genetic testing is also available and can identify whether a woman carries the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation.

 

For women who are identified as high-risk patients, experts recommend a yearly mammogram and MRI breast scan.  An MRI breast scan is used in addition to a mammogram, rather than in place of it.  While an MRI is more sensitive than a mammogram, it does miss some cancers that a mammogram can otherwise detect.

 

In most of these high-risk cases, the combination of mammograms and MRI breast scans should start at age 30 and continue as long as a woman is healthy enough to receive the tests.  However, the age to start the exams should take personal situations and needs into account and can be modified accordingly by the doctor and patient.

 

Women having any of the medical imaging scans mentioned above should do so at a certified diagnostic imaging center to ensure they receive the most accurate tests possible.  The Center for Diagnostic Imaging is proud to offer Comprehensive Breast Care Centers in the Miami area that offer all women access to life-saving mammograms, breast ultrasounds and MRI breast scans.

CDI Miami | Wednesday June 29, 2016

MRI Links Saturated Fats to Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

The presence of high saturated fatty acids in breast tissue may be a useful indicator of cancer in postmenopausal women, according to a new study by researchers at NYU Langone medical Center. The study was published online in Radiology, a journal of the Radiological Society of North America.

The researchers identified the relationship between fatty acids and breast cancer. Perhaps one day, these finding may lead to a greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms behind breast cancer development and the role of fat as a factor in breast cancer diagnosis and progression.

“Our study offers the first evidence — seen in breast tissue — that high saturated fatty acids in the breast adipose tissue is associated with presence of breast cancer in postmenopausal women,” said senior author and investigator Sungheon G. Kim, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Radiology at NYU Langone and a researcher at the Center for Advanced Imaging, Innovation and Research.

The relationship between body mass index (BMI), fat and cancer development has previously been studied, with postmenopausal women found to be at increased risk for breast cancer as their BMI increases. However, this study suggest the composition of the fat itself may play a role as well.

The relationship between body mass index (BMI), fat and cancer development has previously been studied, with postmenopausal women found to be at increased risk for breast cancer as their BMI increases. However, this study suggest the composition of the fat itself may play a role as well.

CDI Miami | Wednesday May 4, 2016

Breast cancer: Scientists discover genetic breakthrough.

The study, published in Nature, has been described as a “milestone” moment that could help unlock new ways of treating and preventing the disease.

 

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CDI Miami | Tuesday April 26, 2016

Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer

Your genes have a lot to say about who you are and how healthy you are. But for certain diseases, including cancer, so many genes are likely involved that it’s hard for doctors to come up with a useful, reliable way to turn your DNA information into a precise risk score.
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CDI Miami | Tuesday February 9, 2016

Adding MRI to Mammography Could Help Detect Aggressive Breast Cancer

Breast imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect a larger tumor burden than can mammography alone, which could impact treatment decisions, according to a study published in Radiology. The retrospective study demonstrated that of 2,021 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients, 285 patients (14%) had additional cancer detected by MRI, 73 of whom had cancers in a different quadrant of the breast than the index tumor.
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CDI Miami | Tuesday December 15, 2015

FDA Approves Cap to Prevent Hair Loss During Chemo

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Hair loss is one of the most despised side effects of chemotherapy, and new technology is now offering a way to save those precious locks.
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CDI Miami | Tuesday December 8, 2015

3D Mammography Aids in Early Cancer Detection

According to a new study, digital breast tomosynthesis, or 3D mammography, can improve the detection of breast cancer, according to a new study.

 

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CDI Miami | Wednesday November 12, 2014

Medicare to Cover Low-Dose CT for Lung Cancer Screening

In a major step forward for lung health and diagnostic screening, on November 10th, 2014 The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed that the evidence is sufficient to add coverage for lung cancer screening counseling and a shared decision making visit, and a screening for lung cancer with low dose computed tomography (LDCT) once per year for qualified beneficiaries. Of course, the coverage is seen as an additional preventive service benefit under the Medicare program, and is available only if certain criteria are met. Continue reading